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Injectable DMEM-induced phenylboronic acid-modified hyaluronic acid self-crosslinking hydrogel

Injectable DMEM-induced phenylboronic acid-modified hyaluronic acid self-crosslinking hydrogel for potential applications in tissue repair


Most of the traditional injectable hydrogels based on light curing or enzyme crosslinking are difficult to control the crosslinking time accurately and lack tissue adhesion, which leads to difficult clinical application and poor tissue repair effect. In this study, a novel injectable DMEM (Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium)-induced phenyl-boronic acid-modified hyaluronic acid self-crosslinking hydrogel was designed and prepared by combining the phenylboronic acid and a diol on hyaluronic acid as the main network, in which dynamically reversible phenylboronic acid esters imparted good self-healing properties and tissue adhesion properties to the hydrogels. Cell medium that induced the formation of the hydrogel could simulate the pH of the physiological environment and provide uniform nutrients for the encapsulated cells. In addition, in vitro cell experiments indicated that the DMEM-induced phenylboronic acid-modified hyaluronic acid self-crosslinking hydrogel was capable of supporting cell loading and proliferation, thus being a promising candidate for tissue repair materials. 1



(a) Scheme of PEG-DC gel formation. (b) Image of the SC gel. (c) Image of the DB-DC gel (left) and the PEG-DC gel (right).  H. Gao et al.
(a) Scheme of PEG-DC gel formation. (b) Image of the SC gel. (c) Image of the DB-DC gel (left) and the PEG-DC gel (right). H. Gao et al.


a) Cyclic strain sweep measurement of SC gel. (b) Shear viscosity curve of SC gel. (c) Syringe injection photo of SC gel. (d) The adhesion between a finger and heart tissue by hydrogel. (e) The adhesion between a finger and porcine skin by hydrogel. (f) The adhesion between two fingers by hydrogel. (g) Schematic illus-tration of lap shear strength tests. (h) The images of lap shear strength tests. (i) The lap shear strength of hydrogels. Fig. 6.SC gel adhered to two (a) GelMA hydrogels or (b) alginate hydrogels, compared with no SC gel applied.  H. Gao et al.
a) Cyclic strain sweep measurement of SC gel. (b) Shear viscosity curve of SC gel. (c) Syringe injection photo of SC gel. (d) The adhesion between a finger and heart tissue by hydrogel. (e) The adhesion between a finger and porcine skin by hydrogel. (f) The adhesion between two fingers by hydrogel. (g) Schematic illus-tration of lap shear strength tests. (h) The images of lap shear strength tests. (i) The lap shear strength of hydrogels. Fig. 6.SC gel adhered to two (a) GelMA hydrogels or (b) alginate hydrogels, compared with no SC gel applied. H. Gao et al.

1. Huichang Gao, Chenxi Yu, Qingtao Li, Xiaodong Cao,

Injectable DMEM-induced phenylboronic acid-modified hyaluronic acid self-crosslinking hydrogel for potential applications in tissue repair,

Carbohydrate Polymers,

Volume 258,

2021,

117663,

ISSN 0144-8617,

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.2021.117663.



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